The Kilkenny Journal

Thursday, 17th August 2017
Latest Edition

Sunday, 26 June 2016 23:20

NEW BREWERY FOR KILKENNY CITY.

JOHN STREET SITE CLEARED FOR NEW SMITHWICKS BREWERY. 
Photos by Michael McGrath, The Kilkenny Journal
The lovely garden centre site at John Street is now cleared to make way for the development of the new Smithwicks Brewery to be formed by Paul Smithwick and his partners, one of whom is descended from the other old Kilkenny brewery family of Sullivans brewery which was located at James's Street Sconce. They are to brew a new Kilkenny real ale. at the former garden site.

The new Kilkenny brewery will trade as Sullivan's Craft Brewery (1702) Ltd and will combine the best of both old Kilkenny breweries, according to Paul Smithwick. 
Here we give a potted history of Smithwicks and Sullivan's breweries where Smithwicks bought out Sullivans at the close of the nineteenth century .

IF there is one family name even more closely linked with Kilkenny right now than Liam MacCarthy, it surely must be Smithwicks. John Smithwick in 1709 begun what was to be a 300 year association (to date) with the city.

The site around St. Francis Abbey has been associated with the brewing of beer ever since the 13th century when the records speak of the ‘fulsome brew’ made there by the monks. Using quality water, taken from the Friar’s own wells mixed with natural ingredients from the lands around the abbey, monks began brewing on the site almost as soon as the abbey itself was established. The Abbey grew in size, reach and importance for more than 300 uninterrupted years. The tragic mid 14th century Black Death which devastated the population of Kilkenny was recorded in stark terms by one of their members, Friar John Clynn. His is perhaps the only contemporary record to survive of this devastating plague in Europe. It took Henry VIII’s dissolution of all monasteries in 1537 to force the Abbey to ultimately close its doors and cut for ever the close religious link with the area.

John Smithwick moved to Kilkenny in the early 1700s to forge a life for himself. He went into the brewing business with Richard Cole on a piece of land that Cole had leased from the Duke of Ormond in 1705. Smithwick worked hard and successfully, quickly becoming the sole owner. In time his business interests expanded. He was one of the few merchants who created a brisk trade selling tea. He worked with skill and diligence to built a fortune amassing wealth in both land and commercial property. John’s sons didn’t follow him into the brewing trade and the brewing and other business that had started the family’s fortune passed from their hands but fortunately, not for long. Edmond Smithwick, son of John Smithwick II, bought the brewery back freehold and the Smithwick family name hung proudly above the door. He proved himself a natural businessman

Edmond was four times Mayor of Kilkenny. He gave generously to the city. When famine hit in 1847, with others he set up a soup kitchen to feed the poor and needy. He also made substantial contributions to the high costs of construction of St. Mary’s Cathedral and became a great supporter of Catholic Emancipation. This interest cemented his friendship with the champion of that cause, the Irish Liberator, Daniel O Connell who was later to become godfather to one of his sons, Daniel O’Connell Smithwick. They still talk of O’Connell’s visit to the Brewery and his electrifying address on that memorable occasion.

Edmond Smithwick is credited with devising and introducing the business strategy of employing the most knowledgeable, the most progressive and the most skilled brewers and work force. He reasoned, correctly they could be relied upon to bring scientific and technical innovation to their task. The results gave Smithwicks beers a quality second to none. He even hired consultant chemists to vet and check the raw ingredients and oversee the final brew. The once, small almost obscure city brewery he had acquired was now a business to be reckoned with.

In the late 1800’s export sales to England and Scotland were very difficult. Individual public houses in those countries were “tied” to specific English based breweries who fought to reduce competition and create for themselves captive markets by this practice. But Smithwicks found a way to survive and the company began selling mineral water and even delivered butter with their ale from the back of their drays. The business not alone survived but by 1892 Smithwick’s won 1st prize in Ireland in the Dublin Rotunda Exhibition of Brewers and Distillers.

When James Smithwick took over in 1900 the fortunes of the company were at an all time low. Smithwick’s still employed 200 people but output was down and auditors – never the most adventurous of advisers - recommended the brewery shut its doors. Instead the Smithwick family dug deep and keep the business going. The range of beers was reduced; new markets were sought; James won military contracts for the sale of beer to garrisoned troops. Output increased. By taking advantage of brewery closures in England he replaced and in the process upgraded his plant and machinery. Sullivan’s Kilkenny Breweries Ltd, his long-standing rival was bought which again provided vitally needed brewing machinery right on his door step. The new municipal water supply introduced in Kilkenny around that time was extremely pure and low in salt and was perfect for brewing ales. It eliminated dependence on local, well-water sources

James’s son Walter Smithwick, already a successful solicitor, took control in the 1930’s. At that time beer heading west went by canal barge, other destination were served by train and even by horse & cart. Walter purchased petrol lorries to serve customers as he realised distribution was to be a major key to success. On top of their salaries he incentivising his sales men all over Ireland who could now earn a commission on every barrel sold, a new and radical concept in the Ireland of the 1930’s

Walter Smithwick was committed to advertising and marketing when that latter concept was hardly recognised as a separate factor in business. Large slogans referring to Smithwick’s No.1 began to appear on buses, trams and in newspapers throughout the land. In October 1937 Smithwick’s No.1 Ale won first prize at the London, Bottled Beer Competition. A national-wide, brand awareness was the company’s far more valuable prize and result.

When the war ended in 1945 business was looking good and by 1949 sales had reached a record 51,500 barrels per annum. The next decade was one of fierce competition with Bass, Double Diamond, Macardles, Perrys and Phoenix all competing for market share. Ultimately none would prove a match for Smithwick’s popular taste and sustained, high quality. By 1959 Smithwick’s was as popular as ever

Around this time Walter and his marketing director, the resourceful W. A. L. (Bill) Finnegan visited Munich and attended the long established and world famous Munich Beer Festival there. The verve, colour, music and excitement of it all captivated them both. That night a decision, which was to have a profound effect on the future progress of Kilkenny and the brewery was hatched. Kilkenny, they resolved, would have a Festival bringing all the trappings of a Bavarian Beer Festival to the banks of the Nore. The huge Beer Tent featuring a traditional Bavarian band and serving staff in suitable eye-catching uniforms is for many people one of the fondest memories of growing up in the Kilkenny during the ‘60. The festival proved an outstanding success for many years and can justly claim to be the first of Ireland’s marketing led festivals. With the strategic, guiding hand of Walter Smithwick, the drive and promotional expertise of Bill Finnegan and later the organisational skill of Mick McGuinness the festival broke new ground and put Kilkenny firmly on the tourist map, a premier position from where it never retreated but rather continued to grow and expand.

The world wide giant, Guinness & Co, one of Smithwick’s oldest malting customers bought a controlling share in the business in 1964. Walter retired from the board the following year after 35 years service and his eldest son, Peter took his place marking the ninth generation this remarkable family has been associated with brewing in Kilkenny.

Peter, also a solicitor, in latter years continued a successful career as a judge and was honoured as President of the Circuit Court and later appointed by the Government as chairman of The Smithwick Enquiry. Meanwhile his high profile brother, Paul Smithwick continues to work to advance the good fortune of Kilkenny from his base in Dublin where he too practiced law for some time.

Meanwhile other branches of the family added to the name, business prowess and range of activities. The large, four story premises of D. Smithwick and Son was an imposing and significant presence on High Street. A second cousin of Walter, Joe Smithwick built up a thriving business in the large premises acquired by his family in 1910 from its previous owners - a Bank, which tradition has it failed in that year. Under his guidance the business prospered and expanded, their famous tea and other groceries being just part of its many services to the public. On his death in 1958 the business passed to his young son Daniel with the faithful John Clifford continuing on as manager. In addition to the business on High Street, Daniel converted part of their old Bottling Store on New Street to develop the concept of Cash And Carry Wholesaling to smaller shops in County Kilkenny and beyond.

This was to prove a fortuitous decision when on Sunday, a far from ‘glorious’ 12th of July” in 1970 the entire High Street edifices was engulfed by fire and left a smouldering ruin. To make matters worst the fire took place during the Bank strike of that year and much cash and many cheques, the takings amassed over previous weeks, which perforce could not be lodged, were in jeopardy. Thanks to the quick thinking and bravery of the fire service all was rescued from the blazing building.

To this day the family are proud of the quick reactions that enabled them with the ready help of their suppliers and the generosity of the owner of a nearby vacant shop to declare it was “business as usual” by the following Friday – a remarkable triumph over sudden adversity and achieved in just 4 working days. The tenacity, determination and business acumen of the Smithwick family was never more tested and never more apparent than during that disastrous week. Later the business was moved in total to New Street where it continued until Daniel’s Smithwick’s retirement recently.

It is worth recording the efforts made by the late Ron Girdham then Head Brewer in Saint Francis Abbey Brewery to re-establish the religious connection by having constructed within the walls of the old abbey a small oratory which he was pleased to title, perhaps somewhat grandly, as “An International Room For Prayer And Contemplation”. Rumour has it he was not must pleased when he overheard someone remark, tongue in cheek, “Seems the ideal place to say an ‘Ale-Mary’!

The Smithwick name is long associated with Kilkenny, with quality and reliability reflecting the ideal combination of modern technology coupled with tradition values. Their family story embodies the best aspects of courage and confidence, enterprise and business triumph over adversity. How their story will unfold in the future we must leave to the future but if the past is anything to go by then one thing is certain, Members of the Smithwick families with continue to make their mark in Ireland and especially in their beloved Kilkenny.

The Kilkenny Journal's photo.
The Kilkenny Journal's photo.
The Kilkenny Journal's photo.
The Kilkenny Journal's photo.
+4
24800 people reached
LikeShow More Reactions
Comment
Published in Front
Saturday, 01 March 2014 16:17

WHAT MEDIEVAL MILE ?

Maybe we are missing something here on the Kilkenny Journal, but what Medieval Mile, where is it? Maybe we need to see Brian McEneaney to get our eyes re-tested? Maybe someone more knowledgeable will point it out to us?
The County Manager mentioned a big new garden for the city and we trust this is to be extended all along the river bank from the new Creative Quarter at the brewery and joined at Green Street to meet up with the Meadows  and continue on into the park once Green's Bridge is pedestrianized and closed to traffic with the arrival of the new CAS bridge.
We do know that the garden set in at the Liverpool docks has been a great success, and our riverside garden will be a real hit with scholars who want to stroll and think in a conducive atmosphere.  Grand, but we still can't see the medieval Mile launched the other night in St. Canice's Cathedral. And if we can't see it the tourists will surely have a hard job finding it.
Councillor John Coonan's idea of including the old gaol under the Courthouse as an attraction to visit is a good one and he deserves full marks for it. Now we could make it really worth while by providing a few wretches for the cells, on bread and water, brought out for the odd flogging on the forecourt, and with the provision of stocks where we could throw rotten tomatoes at them, maybe stretch a fellow on a rack, the possibilities are endless. We are sure that Councillor Coonan's fertile imagination will provide even more possibilities of great medieval entertainment for more and more tourists. It's always good to have such an ideas man around.

High standard urban garden to attract more tourists to Kilkenny

St Francis Abbey will be a huge part of Medieval mile development

St Francis Abbey will be a huge part of Medieval mile development

Altamont Gardens - one of Carlow's top tourist attractions

Altamont Gardens – one of Carlow’s top tourist attractions

Kilkenny needs a high standard garden attraction like Altamount in Carlow in order to draw more tourists to the city.

So says County manager Joe Crockett as design teams bid for a brand new million euro project that will see a linear garden developed along the banks of the Nore.

Its part of the ‘Medieval Mile’ project backed by Failte Ireland.

Mr Crockett says it will help attract the tourists that Ireland is currently chasing.

But we think that rather than launch such ideas amongst the few top elite in town that all such ideas should be put to huge assemblies of the people, especially in the Summer, for their approbation and advice. For far too long this city has been run by certain circles and A-lists and we have to move out beyond those because we think that the people know better. The ideas that come from the people are better and the sheer energy in organisation and maintenance of events comes only from the people.  There have been enough dinners in the castle for the politicians and the elite!

To come back to it the medieval Mile can only be a success if the visitors can readily see it. Thus we need colourful medieval flags and banners the length of it. We need stage props, we need to do up the city much as it was done up for the film "Lock Up Your Daughters! back in 1968. And to do and to manage all that we need our citizens involved not just the usual circle.

 

Published in News

NEW IRISH PARTY DOES WELL IN CARLOW-KILKENNY .

Peter O'Loughlin - "I shall return!"

As Cllr. Paddy McKee seeks to publicise and grow his new Renua party here in Kilkenny, yet another new party emerged in the Carlow-Kilkenny by-election. Local people have welcomed both parties and thirty locals even helped out in assenting to the IDENTITY IRELAND candidate Peter O'Loughlin's candidature by going to the Kilkenny Garda station and vouching for and signing for him there, though he and his party were relatively unknown, so what's the story, who are they , what's the attraction?

The party is called IDENTITY IRELAND and as its candidate Peter scored almost a thousand number one votes , and another couple of thousand two, three and four preference votes as was seen by the tally people at the count. This despite the fact that the party jumped into Carlow-Kilkenny and parachuted their man Peter O'Loughlin in here with only three weeks to go to election day.

Peter O'Loughlin himself admits that with his small election team locally he didn't get to knock on or canvass a single door in the constituency, nor did he manage to get a single one of his posters up in Kilkenny city though he managed to get some up in Carlow town and a small area around Thomastown, Callan and Kells.

People see the new party as "Ireland's UKIP" though that's a rough comparison, the new Identity Ireland party is much more than that. They concentrate more on jobs and industrial development than UKIP does, for instance, with serious policies on the restoration of our fisheries and the revival of the Irish sugar industry.

Peter O'Loughlin personally took a great interest in the establishment of Knowledge industries , including a research department of the proposed new Technological University of the South-East mooted for Kilkenny , being the only candidate to actually go and visit the old brewery site where it's to be located and see the proposals for himself.

He also went and viewed the proposals for the new CAS bridge for Kilkenny and came away dissatisfied with the design: " The new bridge needs to be in keeping with its medieval Kilkenny environment", he said, "a suitable design, specific to Kilkenny city, must be explored that would satisfy this criterion."

He wants to establish branches of the new party in Kilkenny and Carlow and indeed offices here if he's eventually elected. He'll be contesting the general election here which should be later this year, so it's no harm to get to know all about him and the new party from now on.

Identity Ireland dipped their toes into the waters of the Nore and the Barrow electorally, and basically without being able to canvas on this occasion they're satisfied with the result that people are getting to know about the party and principals better, he explained.

He went on to state that he has learned a lot about Kilkenny and its needs and admits that he would love to live here in the city permanently as our TD. But he's young, passionate and dedicated , willing to wait and says it will take about four or five years to develop and grow Identity Ireland in Kilkenny and across the country. And though it will take longer than Renua to become an established Irish political party Peter says he prefers Identity Ireland to start off with no system politicians and to grow organically from the people.

Peter admires countries like Japan who want to preserve their own identity, culture and traditions into the future and therefore have strict controls on any immigration at all. He likes the Australian model of immigration control and would adapt that to the Irish immigration control system which is now totally collapsed and run down, with more immigrants per head now in Ireland than in the neighbouring UK and still streaming in, mostly for our welfare and our council houses. This has to be stopped if local Irish people are to have any chance in life at all, Peter insists.

He feels for people like the taxi drivers whose occupations have been destroyed, seized and taken over by fleets of foreigners,which he learned is also the case with Kilkenny as he spoke to several local taxi drivers in the city during the by-election campaign, and he vows he will act to help restore Irish people's livelihoods if elected.

He spoke to parents worried about the collapse in the standard of education in Kilkenny with schools and class sizes bursting at the seams, and as a teacher himself he says that the situation is horrific all over with immigrant children with poor English taking up so much of the time in class at the expense of Irish students being taught well.
We ourselves see this at third level with even Trinity College, our old alma mater, pushed out of the top fifty universities in the world, as it was back in 2009, and now even pushed out of the top hundred because of the drawback that international students have become on our most eminent educational institution.

We see it in all the language schools that have collapsed in Dublin, most of them no more than frauds, fronts and setups to get thousands of foreign students into this country and then when the fraudulent language schools collapse these thousands of students are put over onto the Irish welfare system and all Irish services free. It's a scam . No wonder the country went bust and it will happen again if we are not careful, Peter and Identity Ireland warn.

The hospitals are the same with people in the corridors because of the immigrant population explosion and most all of the million immigrants here covered by medical cards and driving the waiting lists into such delays as now threaten the lives of a whole cohort of Irish patients. Again Peter and Identity Ireland state that they will end all this and bring all our services, especially the health service, back to normal at least.

Immigrants on welfare will all be given three months notice of termination of all payments and Identity Ireland does not care about what the EU thinks or dictates, the new party will do this. This is what local Kilkenny taxi man Kevin Barry has always proposed, Identity Ireland thinks this is a great idea.

There would be no mass deportations , as the Loonie Left propagandise, simply no more welfare or council houses for immigrants at a massive saving to this country. Irish foreign aid would be cut by half a billion to a more realistic 200 millions per annum, considering the small size of Ireland and its economy. Immigrants would get vouchers instead for hostels such as the Good Shepherd hostel in Kilkenny and the V de P hostel in Carlow. There wouldn't be many young Pakistanis flooding in here from Birmingham then!

Identity Ireland sees that from the vote Renua and Paddy McKee got here in Kilkenny - and they have great time for tryers like Paddy - it's obvious that the people want a new party, but Identity Ireland thinks that that new party is not Renua.
"They're set up as a catch-all party same as FF and FG , they do not have our distinct and unique policies which as we outline are the only policies now to save Ireland and the Irish people and bring up our economy," says Identity Ireland.

So IDENTITY IRELAND believes that they can capture most of the type of vote in Carlow-Kilkenny and throughout the country that went to Renua here in Kilkenny.
"We have to work on it though and we need meetings and members here in Kilkenny and beyond in Carlow to bring our new party to that stage, to a stage where at least I'll have a canvassing team and posters up in Kilkenny come the general election in a few months time, " Peter explains.

In the recent Carlow-Kilkenny by-election Peter was up against Taoiseach Enda Kenny, Micheal Martin, Gerry Adams , Lucinda Creighton, Joan Burton , Richard Bruton and Charlie Flanagan - not to mention Liam Aylward - all knocking on doors while he couldn't get to any door due to running a campaign with only three or four people at the most, but he's happy and optimistic , it was a fair start considering all of those VIP's, and they won't be back here in the general election that's looming, you won't have the Taoiseach and all the rest of them on the doorsteps and shaking hands in Kilkenny's streets again in the General election, mercifully !

His associate Cllr. Seamus Treanor, the former Mayor of Monaghan, who helped launch Peter's election campaign officially in Carlow -Kilkenny, states that mass immigration is costing Ireland 9 BILLIONS a year.

Even if it is ONLY costing us 4 BILLIONS a year as calculated elsewhere, it's colossal money that the government are borrowing every single year to finance mass immigration into Ireland , and it's all going onto our National Debt , about 50 BILLIONS so far borrowed and wasted on mass immigration alone!.

This is going to sink this country again and affect all public salaries and pensions and welfare money if we do not move to stop it now, and that's principally what Identity Ireland wants to do with your help and your vote, to rescue Ireland's future for the Irish people. Peter O'Loughlin, Carlow-Kilkenny candidate for Identity Ireland concluded.

The Kilkenny Journal's photo.

 

Published in Front
Wednesday, 01 October 2014 18:44

IRISH WATER WRECKS THE CITY

IRISH WATER WRECKS CITY PATHS.

Irish water is wrecking Kilkenny city, digging up paths all across city estates, and now they're starting to dig up the old city. It seems they can do what they like regardless of the damage they do to this city. They make ugly patchwork repairs to their widespread destruction, leaving areas look dreadful.

And now they are starting on the old borough area, the m...ost sensitive part of the city. They are commencing on areas like James' Green and Blackmill Street, right up against the jewel in the crown, St. Mary's cathedral, totally unrestricted by any archaeological concern. They must be stopped before they do any more damage in the historic areas of the city frequented by tourists. But how?

There's not a politician or an official prepared to object to them, in fact there is not even a journalist outside of ourselves prepared to criticize them. They are the most privileged wreckers ever to operate in Ireland!
Published in News
Tuesday, 10 June 2014 17:48

A ROSE BY ANY OTHER NAME...

A rose by any other name...

The CAS is dead, long live the CAS. The county council brought in a PR firm at great expense to change the name of the CAS to the "Green's Bridge Replacement Project".

Now any intelligent alcoholic, and alcoholics are generally of above-average intelligence, could have told the manager that for the price of another bottle.

The only difference between any intelligen...t alcoholic and a PR consultant is that the latter has a luxury office, expensive looking stationary, a designer suit and a Cartier watch.

Yet the PR industry has recently managed to take Phil Hogan for 50 millions just to brand Irish Water.

But it depends too on who you take breakfast with. Phil took breakfast in Mount Juliet with Denis O'Brien on Sunday and on Monday the latter then bought a company to install water meters!

We hereby therefore include our proposed design for the Green's Bridge replacement and all we ask is a breakfast with Phil Hogan at Mount Juliet in the certain knowledge that we can take it from there very profitably indeed.




Published in Entertainment
Monday, 13 April 2015 21:30

Ye Olde Kilkenny RIC Station.

A tranquil setting to the rear of the old RIC barracks at the Bull Ring, Kilkenny. This is going to be very valuable land within the zoned area for the projected Abbey Creative Quarter at the old brewery site.

Published in Photo Features
Tuesday, 23 June 2015 14:20

THE TOWN FARCE

THE TOWN FARCE.

Kilkenny "City "Council" a Mickey Mouse job.
-so-called council doesn't even have a bank account!

...

What your local councillor won't tell you.

After Hogan abolished Kilkenny Borough Council last year a sub-committee of the County Council took over the city. Basically in Northern Ireland terms Kilkenny city is under direct rule from County Hall in John Street.

And this sub-committee is named "Kilkenny Municipal Council" in an attempt to fool us all further. This Mickey Mouse city council has no powers except to create freemen and the like and to host social occasions in the town hall. And to dress up.

It has no powers to advance the city. If it had then the new bridge could have been stopped by it, for instance.

It's a dress up council for county councillors from county hall to come over and dress up in the former Kilkenny Corporation robes of office and to elect a chairman from their midst who is then dubbed mayor. This so-called "city council" does not even have a bank account!

And as anybody in the local media will tell you, you will never find another body of men and women anywhere so brilliant at praising one another and bluffing that they're so important and mouthing garbage as they do so. That's what it is degenerated to now.

Meanwhile the latest fella to be elected Mayor of Kilkenny by that useless body last night, Wexfordman Joe Malone, is off over to Kilkenny Military Barracks this afternoon to celebrate his mayoralty with a guard of honour and the celebration of the Most Holy Sacrifice of the Mass .

And most appropriately for a man who declared two years ago that he wants a soup kitchen instead of the five-million medieval mile project paving High Street and the city centre , the Army is laying on soup and sandwiches for the occasion of their celebration of the new mayor who was a private soldier of theirs for thirty years...

The rest of the stooges from the town hall should be in attendance, all dressed up.

We look forward to Mayor G.I. Joe's soup kitchen whenever it gets it up and running!
Keep a bowl for us, Joe:-)

Published in Front

KILKENNY HOUSING CRISIS. THE BY-ELECTION BIG ISSUE .
Candidates clash as Kilkenny housing list tops 3,500 applicants. - McGuinness says he's worried.

Sinn Fein says they will provide an extra 6500 houses nationally - while by-election candidate Peter O'Loughlin charges that the Shinners would give most of the council houses away to immigrants, no matter how many new houses we could build.

...

"It's the same as the jobs", he says -" most of the new jobs created are going to immigrants! "

Asked should the refugees and asylum seekers be allocated housing on a pro-rata basis, Peter said:

"There is no way in the world that that should happen. I would be totally against that. That would be very unfair to people born and reared in Carlow and Kilkenny who are on the housing lists. "

"There is no hint of racism in what I say. I have no problem with non-nationals , but I do have a problem when it comes to housing stock if the Government isn't prepared to provide additional funding to build all the extra homes to tackle this crisis."

Peter called for the declaration of a national housing emergency, but this time he insists that the developers should be cut out with direct construction by all the councils. And he insists that he would not house a non-national refugee or asylum seeker in front of a qualified Irish applicant , as is being done wholesale at the moment.

People born in Africa and Asia for instance do not have a human right to get a council house in Ireland. They do have a right to shelter, food and clothing, and that's all available in hostels throughout the country like the Good Shepherd hostel in Kilkenny city and there's another in Carlow . Surely if it is good enough for the Irish it's good enough for the incomers.

In the meantime the housing crisis now tops the by-election issues in Kilkenny, with no candidate except Peter O'Loughlin identifying the cause of it, and the facts and the truth behind it.

He says the housing situation is now desperate and that he intends to do his best to help all the local Irish applicants in Kilkenny and Carlow get preference if he is elected.

See More
The Kilkenny Journal's photo.

 

Published in Front

STATE INVESTMENT BODY TO FUND ABBEY CREATIVE QUARTER IN KILKENNY.
Huge investment in jobs here mooted, Taoiseach himself interested.

The Ireland Strategic Investment Fund’s (ISIF) next project could be a major regeneration project in Kilkenny, as the Council considers its options for the redevelopment of the former Smithwick’s Brewery site in the city.

...

The proposed phased redevelopment includes the creation of a dedicated business, enterprise and third-level research facility as part of the first phase.

The fund, which is managed by the National Treasury Management Agency, could provide equity and loan finance for the initial phase, and may work with the Council on the subsequent phases of the development. Already there have been expressions of interest from Irish and international companies which may look at locating business operations on the site, and third-level institutions interested in the research facilities.

The Council is considering ISIF’s response to its request for investment funding.

“Projects of this nature are consistent with the ISIF’s dual mandate to seek both investment return and economic impact from the investments it makes,” said ISIF director Eugene O’Callaghan.

“Significant progress has been made by the Council to a point where we believe this project can deliver a commercial return if structured appropriately and make a significant contribution to economic activity and employment in Kilkenny and the surrounding region.”

The ISIF was set up last year, replacing the National Pensions Reserve Fund and tasked with making investments on a commercial basis to support economic activity and employment in the State.

To date, it has made investment commitments of €1.5 billion

See More
"STATE INVESTMENT BODY TO FUND ABBEY CREATIVE QUARTER IN KILKENNY. 
Huge investment in jobs here mooted, Taoiseach himself interested.  

The Ireland Strategic Investment Fund’s (ISIF) next project could be a major regeneration project in Kilkenny, as the Council considers its options for the redevelopment of the former Smithwick’s Brewery site in the city. 

The proposed phased redevelopment includes the creation of a dedicated business, enterprise and third-level research facility as part of the first phase. 

The fund, which is managed by the National Treasury Management Agency, could provide equity and loan finance for the initial phase, and may work with the Council on the subsequent phases of the development. Already there have been expressions of interest from Irish and international companies which may look at locating business operations on the site, and third-level institutions interested in the research facilities. 

The Council is considering ISIF’s response to its request for investment funding. 

“Projects of this nature are consistent with the ISIF’s dual mandate to seek both investment return and economic impact from the investments it makes,” said ISIF director Eugene O’Callaghan. 

“Significant progress has been made by the Council to a point where we believe this project can deliver a commercial return if structured appropriately and make a significant contribution to economic activity and employment in Kilkenny and the surrounding region.” 

The ISIF was set up last year, replacing the National Pensions Reserve Fund and tasked with making investments on a commercial basis to support economic activity and employment in the State. 

To date, it has made investment commitments of €1.5 billion"

 

Published in News

The gable end of the former no 22 Vicar Street now corseted in steel by Kilkenny County Council as work proceeds apace on the CAS bridge access from Vicar Street across a couple of back gardens to the new bridge site at the river only 100 yards distant.
At the other side of the bridge access road the house at no. 20 is well secured. The bridge itself is to resume in a couple of months time for the summer. It is more important than ever now with up to 28 millions being poured into the projected new Abbey Creative Quarter there at the river on the old Smithwicks brewery site.

Published in Photo Features
Page 1 of 3

Advertise With Us

Advertise Here
Kilkenny's veteran professional photographer
Click here for more information

Get our Newsletter

Just enter your email address to keep up to date with the Kilkenny Journal News.

Filter News by Date

« August 2017 »
Mon Tue Wed Thu Fri Sat Sun
  1 2 3 4 5 6
7 8 9 10 11 12 13
14 15 16 17 18 19 20
21 22 23 24 25 26 27
28 29 30 31      

Login

Joomla! Debug Console

Session

Profile Information

Memory Usage

Database Queries