The Kilkenny Journal

Sunday, 28th May 2017
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SISTER STANISLAUS KENNEDY TODAY.
The dark past of sex abuse in St.Joseph's, Kilkenny.

The whole sordid truth.

Today "Sister Stan", as she was once affectionately known in Kilkenny, is still steeped in controversy having spoken out in favour of gay marriage during the recent successful referendum campaign as well as running "Doras Luimni" , a charity that concerns itself with assisting immigration into Ireland.

This is no ordinary nun, this is the tireless campaigner out there agitating for the greatest of liberal and leftist causes , some against the interests of her own church and bishops. This is a woman who gets her portrait painted, she is even hanging in the National Gallery , her painting done by the German painter they hired. She is of course pictured as being very humble, a latter-day Mother Teresa, by the artist Vera Klute. All at the expense of the Irish taxpayer, of course, what's new?

But is she really as innocent over St. Joseph's as she protests?. She was the power behind the throne of the Bishop who ignored the scandalous child sexual abuse regime at the former St. Joseph's Orphanage in Kilkenny. In fact she may well have advised Bishop Birch in that horrible episode in relatively recent times. There have been serious allegations for years against this nun but she has always managed to elude her accusers despite some very credible evidence.

Kennedy is a very formidable woman. It was an open secret around Kilkenny that she dominated Birch, a weak man though well intentioned.

Let's therefore cast our eyes back to the dubious circumstances surrounding this nun and the evil events that went on for fifty years at St. Joseph's. Here is the best article on St. Joseph's and what happened there, told by the great investigative journalist Mary Raftery:

'We were not responsible'

by Mary Raftery.

"For over a decade a group of children at St Joseph's industrial school in Kilkenny were abused. The Sisters of Charity and the then Minister for Education covered up that abuse and the order of nuns now refuses to take responsibility for what happened. Some of the most startling revelations to have emerged from the public hearings of the Child Abuse Commission concern an industrial school in Kilkenny, St Joseph's, run by the Irish Sisters of Charity. It is a story of a bishop writing coded notes, of references to a mysterious Sister A, of adult seminarians running around naked with young boys, of a bishop too fragile to be told that children had been sexually abused, of cover-up at government minister level and of a nun who today expresses sorrow on behalf of her order but refuses to apologise. It is above all the tragic story of children subjected to an appalling litany of over a decade of abuse.

The Kilkenny saga also provides the only clue so far on how the courts might attribute responsibility between state and church for the abuse of children in institutions. The High Court ruled that in one case of abuse at St Joseph's the Sisters of Charity had full liability, with the state being held to bear no responsibility.

This has profound implications for the government and its negotiation of the notorious church/ state deal whereby the state is paying out over 90 per cent of the 1bn cost of compensating victims of child abuse at institutions, with the religious orders contributing less than 10 per cent.

To understand what happened at St Joseph's in Kilkenny, one must go back to the mid-1960s. There exists a piece of old, black-and-white RT footage which shows a group of about 20 small boys, all under six, gathered at the door of a large, institutional-type building. The boys look happy enough and some are clasping buckets and spades. They are inmates of St Patrick's industrial school in Kilkenny, also run by the Sisters of Charity. They are about to go on a trip to the seaside.

In the knowledge of the rape and torture to which several of these boys were shortly to be subjected over a number of years, the footage is searingly tragic.

Soon after this piece of film was shot, St Patrick's was shut down as an industrial school for boys under 10. Those children aged between four and six were transferred up the road to another Sisters of Charity industrial school, St Joseph's, which had previously catered only for girls. The boys, 32 of them, were initially accommodated in two large rooms, where they ate, slept and played.

At one stage, reports of the behaviour of a group of four students from St Kieran's seminary in Kilkenny came to the attention of the head nun at St Joseph's, Sr Joseph Conception O'Donoghue. These students had been brought into the industrial school to supervise the boys during the night.

In 1995, Sr Conception made a statement to the Garda as part of their investigations into a series of child abuse allegations against several individuals employed at St Joseph's during the 1960s and 1970s. One of the incidents Sr Conception deals with concerns this group of students. According to her statement, she was told that the students and the children they were supervising "were running around naked".

She reported the matter to a local garda who did occasional voluntary work with the children at St Joseph's. He told a local priest, who in turn informed the Dean of Students at St Kieran's. Sr Conception took no further action. She states that the students did not return to the industrial school, and adds, "I didn't mention this incident to anyone."

This was merely the first of a long list of incidents and reports of abuse or suspected abuse at St Joseph's. One of the boys' earliest carers at the institution, Teresa Connolly, assaulted them both physically and sexually. She was convicted for this abuse in 1999.

By 1971, with the boys getting older, the nuns were keen to employ a man to look after them. That year, the first childcare course in Ireland was organised. It took place in Kilkenny and was run by Sister of Charity Stanislaus Kennedy. Its first graduates emerged in 1972, and among them was David Murray. He was immediately employed by the nuns at St Joseph's. They were delighted that the boys would now have a father figure to look up to.

In 1997, Murray was sentenced to 10 years in prison for buggery and acts of gross indecency on a number of the boys. Judge Matthews stated at the trial: "Never in the history of childcare in this state has one childcare worker caused so much damage. If these sad facts teach us anything, it is that we must listen to those who cannot and have not in the past been heard."

Murray had spent over three years terrorising the children at St Joseph's. They describe how he would come to some boy's bed almost every night and anally rape him. He would set his Alsatian dog Thunder on the children. Even the nuns were terrified of the dog. He threatened to kill the boys if they told anyone what he was doing to them.

He took one boy, Raymond Noctor, out of his bed in the dead of night and brought him outside to a cabbage patch. He told Raymond that he would bury him there if he talked.

However, displaying remarkable courage, a number of the boys, including Raymond Noctor, did tell. They complained to the head nun, Sr Conception, among others. They have always maintained that they told her about the sexual abuse. She has repeatedly denied this, saying that her understanding of their complaints was that David Murray was merely being hard on them.

According to her Garda statement during the investigation of Murray's crimes 20 years later in 1995, she does accept that Raymond Noctor came to her in the mid-1970s and told her that Murray was "at the boys". She claims that she understood this to mean "nagging at them and giving them the odd slap".

In her Garda statement, Sr Conception describes children in severe distress, several of them running away, and all complaining about Murray. Her response was to tell him not to be so hard on the boys. It was only in 1976, when another individual told her that Murray was "abusing the boys", that she says she realised "something serious was going on".

David Murray was then fired by Sr Conception. However, it was revealed at the public hearings of the Child Abuse Commission that she did Murray one last service. The commission heard that in 1979 Murray secured a job looking after children at Scoil Ard Mhuire in Lusk, Co Dublin, a reformatory school for boys.

As a routine matter, the Lusk school asked Sr Conception for a reference for Murray, as she was a previous employer. The nun obliged, sending back the details of Murray's employment record at St Joseph's. She made no reference to him being fired for abusing the children.

Sr Una O'Neill, the current superior general of the Sisters of Charity was asked at the commission hearings why no attempt was made to warn the Lusk school about Murray's record of abuse. She was unable to provide a satisfactory answer.

What makes this particularly egregious is that David Murray continued his rampage of child rape at Lusk during 1980 and 1981. It was not until 20 years later, in 2001, that he was convicted for the buggery of one child at this institution and on six counts of indecent assault and three of gross indecency. Described by Justice McCartan on this occasion as "evil and dangerous", Murray received a further 10-year jail sentence.

Back at St Joseph's, Kilkenny, in 1976, Sr Conception set about hiring another male childcare worker to replace David Murray. She employed an Englishman by the name of Myles Brady.

Brady was an extraordinarily violent man and had a problem with drink. He was known as 'whiskey-breath' by the children. He beat them frequently with hurley sticks and anything else that came to hand. He also sexually abused several of the boys.

In early 1977, another childcare worker at St Joseph's, Edward Murphy, complained to Sr Conception about Brady's treatment of the children. He was fobbed off. The nun has since said that she did not take his complaint seriously as he was only a trainee at the time.

With a highly commendable dedication to the welfare of the boys, Edward Murphy took the matter further. He approached the most high-profile nun in Kilkenny at the time, Sr Stanislaus Kennedy. Sr Stan was then running both the childcare course and the Kilkenny social services programme, an enormously progressive operation organised in conjunction with the Diocese of Ossory and the local bishop Peter Birch.

Edward Murphy has said that he was not aware that Brady was sexually abusing the boys ? his complaint related to physical abuse. Sr Stan has repeatedly stated that she knew nothing of sexual abuse at St Joseph's until she was contacted by the garda during their 1995 investigation into the crimes of Myles Brady and David Murray.

In the 1970s Sr Stan was the country's leading expert in childcare. Her understanding of her meeting with Edward Murphy is expressed in the statement she made to the garda in 1995.

In this statement, signed by her in the presence of her solicitor, she stated Edward Murphy "complained to me that Myles Brady was physically abusing the children. I picked up on it that he might have been sexually abusing them as well. I told Eddie Murphy to tell Sr Conception. Eddie Murphy came back to me and said the children were going to tell the guards. Eddie Murphy either [said] the children are going or have gone to the Guards. I can't be exactly sure of what Eddie Murphy said. Eddie Murphy left St Joseph's shortly after that and Myles Brady also left. Eddie Murphy was very upset when he told me about Myles Brady."

Sr Stan also stated that she had a "vague recollection" of another individual, a local man from the town, complaining to her about the treatment of the children at St Joseph's. However, she adds later in her Garda statement that "with regard to what happened in St Joseph's you simply did not ask. I knew nothing about the running of St Joseph's."

We know that Sr Stan did not at any stage discuss these complaints with the head nun of St Joseph's, Sr Conception, not even after Edward Murphy's resignation in protest. His resignation letter stated that the situation concerning Myles Brady was "highly undesirable and unsafe".

We also know that Murphy informed Bishop Birch of the abuse of children at St Joseph's. The Child Abuse Commission was told that a copy of Murphy's resignation letter was found in diocesan files. The commission also discovered a cryptic note in the files, handwritten by Bishop Birch. This was displayed on screen at the commission hearings. It read as follows:

"Ed approached Sr. A to talk to boys re drunkenness etc. She promised to look into it.

2. She talked to boys one and a half hours, was shocked by what heard.

3. She asked B to stay off when off.

4. Some days later off duty beat a boy badly.

5. Ed threatened to resign. Offer of alternative job. Ed wants investigation, offer withdrawn.

6. Mr Granville investigating (Ed told) and had seen Ed's letter.

7. Phoned Mr. Granville ? knew nothing of it."

A number of aspects of this note are intriguing. Firstly, it is interesting that the bishop should have felt the need to be so coded in his references to particular individuals. The Child Abuse Commission appeared satisfied that the "Ed" referred to is Edward Murphy, and that "B" is Myles Brady. The identity of "Sister A", however, remains unknown. It was stated that she is not Sr Conception. Since we are aware of only one other nun who was informed of Brady's abuse of the children, namely Sr Stanislaus Kennedy, it is possible that she is the "Sister A" referred to here. It is also interesting that Bishop Birch should record that Brady "beat a boy badly". There is nothing to show that either the bishop or the mysterious Sister A took any serious action on foot of this or any other complaint made to them.

Finally, the reference to "Mr Granville". He was the Department of Education's inspector of industrial schools at the time. He has consistently denied that he was ever informed of the abuse of children at St Joseph's, despite claims from Sr Conception that she told him. Bishop Birch's note would appear to support Mr Granville in this. However, it is not recorded if Granville took any action on foot of the bishop's own phone call on the matter, although we have no knowledge so far of what exactly the bishop told him.

And there matters lay for a few months. Edward Murphy had resigned, but from the point of view of the nuns and the bishop, the situation had been contained. Myles Brady continued exactly as before. There was no relief for the boys from his beatings and sexual assaults.

Then, in June of 1977, five months after Murphy's resignation, all hell broke loose. One of the boys of St Joseph's invited a classmate back to the institution for tea one evening. Myles Brady brought this boy, then aged 12, into his room and sexually assaulted him.

Some weeks after the abuse, the boy was found by his mother sticking pins into a photograph of Brady. He then told his family what had happened. Sr Conception was informed shortly afterwards. She persists in her claim that she did not understand the complaint she received to refer to sexual abuse. She nonetheless took immediate action.

Myles Brady had gone to Dublin for the weekend. Sr Conception contacted local garda John Tuohy, and together they went to Dublin to confront Brady. The Child Abuse Commission heard that Tuohy unambiguously informed Brady that the allegation against him was one of sexual assault of a child. Brady admitted the abuse, was fired on the spot and told never to return to Kilkenny.

Tuohy made a report to his superiors on the matter, but no prosecution was taken against Brady at the time as there was no direct complaint from the victim. It is, however, interesting to note that Tuohy, who later became a sergeant, was central to the 1995-1997 investigation and conviction of the succession of paedophiles who worked at St Joseph's.

Myles Brady pleaded guilty in 1997 to several counts of sexually assaulting a number of children and received a four-year prison sentence. He died in 1999.

In 2003, in what became known as 'The Visitor Case', the boy (now an adult) from the town who had been sexually abused by Brady took a civil action against both the Sisters of Charity and the Department of Education. He had emigrated to Spain and had been deeply traumatised by the abuse. He had at one stage attempted to take his own life.

Unlike most victims of abuse at children's institutions, this man was not entitled to seek compensation from the Residential Institutions Redress Board, as he was only a visitor to the school and not an inmate.

Equally, the case did not come within the definition of the state indemnity provided to religious orders as part of the church/state deal. Consequently, this was to be the first time a court would be able to assess the relative responsibilities of the state and the religious orders who ran the industrial schools.

Although the Department of Education and the Sisters of Charity were co-defendants in the action, they fought hard to attach as much blame as possible to each other. Justice Kevin O'Higgins' judgement in the High Court was startling. He found the Sisters of Charity, as managers of the institution concerned and as the employer of Myles Brady, to be 100 per cent liable for the damages of ?75,000 awarded to the plaintiff. The judge's conclusion that the state had zero liability flies directly in the face of the church/state deal, in which the government (ie the taxpayer) has shouldered 90 per cent of the compensation payout to abuse victims.

While it has been pointed out that there are certain unique features to this case, most notably that the victim was not in the care of the state as a child, it is worth examining exactly what Justice O'Higgins said in his lengthy and carefully argued judgement. His conclusions have much wider implications in terms of defining the relationship between state and church in the running of the industrial schools:

"The roles of the department and of the managers [ie the religious orders] are clearly delineated in the Children's Act, 1908. Although Sr Joseph Conception stated: 'We were totally accountable to the Department of Education,' this does not accurately reflect the large level of autonomy in the running of the institution given to the managers and provided for in the statutory framework. The role of the department... 'to certify, to inspect, and to advise' more accurately describes the reality of the situation. In those circumstances... I do not think that in the context of this particular case the Minister [for Education] can be made liable for the assault, the subject matter of these proceedings."

In the light of the deeply shocking litany of abuse suffered by the boys of St Joseph's, it is difficult to comprehend the attitude of Sr Una O'Neill in her testimony to the Child Abuse Commission. As head of the Sisters of Charity, she appeared unwilling to commit herself to an apology to the children so grievously injured while in the care of her order.

"If an apology were in anyway to link us with the David Murrays and Myles Bradys of this world then in no way would an apology be given," she told the commission. She added that her order expressed regret and sorrow that children were abused, but she did not accept that the nuns shared any responsibility for that abuse.

A constant refrain of the Sisters of Charity has been that they had no knowledge or awareness prior to the late 1980s of even the existence of such a phenomenon as child sexual abuse. They repeated this as recently as the 1990s, when evidence emerged that several of the children at Madonna House in Dublin, run by the order, had been abused by a maintenance man employed by the nuns. In fact, as a result of evidence presented at the Child Abuse Commission's public hearings, it is now possible to trace this order's detailed knowledge of child sex abuse back as far as the mid-1950s.

Sr Una O'Neill was questioned at the commission about an extraordinary incident which occurred at St Joseph's Kilkenny in 1954. The nun in charge at the time had applied to the Department of Education for permission to transfer a number of girls to a reformatory in Limerick. The children were described as having misbehaved.

The department's medical inspector of industrial schools, Anna McCabe, became curious and paid a visit to St Joseph's in Kilkenny. She interviewed the girls and discovered that nine of them had been sexually abused by a house-painter employed by the nuns. When the head nun was confronted with this by Anna McCabe, she admitted it was true.

Up to this point, the Department of Education cannot be faulted it did its job properly by unearthing serious crimes against children, crimes which had not been reported to anyone by the nuns in charge. However, what followed can only be construed as a clear obstruction of justice.

A comprehensive cover-up was organised. A meeting was arranged, attended by the superior general of the Sisters of Charity, two senior Department of Education officials, the local parish priest Fr O'Keefe, and the nun in charge of St Joseph's. At the urging of Fr O'Keefe, it was agreed that the matter would not be reported to garda. It was also decided not to inform the bishop, who was apparently too old, too frail and too deaf to be told. The cover-up was sanctioned at the highest level by the Minister for Education, Fine Gael's Richard Mulcahy.

The Kilkenny paedophile was simply dismissed from his post. He was never charged with any offence. As to the girls, some were transferred, others remained in Kilkenny. There was no evidence presented at the Child Abuse Commission public hearings of any particular concern being evinced for their welfare or for the trauma they had suffered.

It seems that no child protection measures were put in place by the Sisters of Charity on foot of their direct experience of such a serious occurrence of child sexual abuse in the 1950s. Instead, every effort was made to suppress all knowledge of the incident. By burying their heads in the sand with such single-minded determination, the nuns were destined to repeat their appalling mistakes throughout the 1970s in Kilkenny and during the 1980s and 1990s in Madonna House, with tragic consequences for the dozens of boys and girls so savagely robbed of their innocence and their childhoods by a seemingly endless succession of paedophiles employed by these religious sisters.

By refusing even today to acknowledge their share of responsibility for this abuse, the Sisters of Charity continue to abuse those they failed to protect as vulnerable children in their care. And through its extraordinarily generous indemnity deal, the state continues to protect the nuns from the consequences of their negligence.

Sr Stan responds

I have read Mary Raftery's article and consider it to be very selective, subjective and biased. However, having been invited to respond to the article as it relates to me I am confining myself to that.

I have stated publicly before that I did not know about sexual abuse in St. Joseph's Kilkenny in the 70's or 80's. In addition I did not know anybody else who knew about sexual abuse in St. Joseph's. However, for the record, let me state the facts again.

Eddie Murphy, the former childcare worker at St. Joseph's, confirmed in a letter to The Irish Times (December 1999) that I could not have known from him about sexual abuse at St. Joseph's, because he himself did not know about it at that time either. When I was interviewed by the Gardai eighteen years later in 1995, I was speaking with the benefit of hindsight. Any fair-minded person would acknowledge that there was a vast difference between the public awareness and discussion of sexual abuse during the 1970's and today.

In the only part of the article where Mary Raftery is complimentary about me, she is also inaccurate. I was not 'running' the Kilkenny Social Services programme or the Kilkenny Child Care course. She also greatly exaggerates my standing in the world of childcare. I was certainly not the 'country's leading expert in child care'.

I never worked in St. Joseph's orphanage. I am not the 'Sister A' referred to in Mary Raftery's article, nor do I know the person to whom that referred.

Terrible things happened to some of the boys in St. Joseph's. For me, as for all the Sisters, it is a source of unending sadness and profound regret that the trained lay childcare workers we employed, in a sincere attempt to improve conditions, were responsible for the physical, sexual and emotional abuse of the children in our care. This is the dark side of the history of St. Joseph's, but there is another side. Very many of the former residents of St. Joseph's and their families are still in regular contact with the Sisters of Charity and remember St. Joseph's as a place where they were reared, loved and cared for. a place they remember fondly as 'home'.

May I repeat once more: I did not know of sexual abuse in St. Joseph's until it became a matter of public knowledge during the Garda investigations in the 1990's.

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CITIZENSHIP BEING THROWN AROUND LIKE CONFETTI.
Ireland borrowing Billions to finance them all.

Yet another massive citizenship giveaway ceremony took place today with 2500 foreigners being granted Irish citizenship that they did not earn and have not done anything for.

...

It costs each of the applicants a grand - but that's dirt cheap for a council house, the dole, university education, medical cards and free health and hospital for life.

And they can now as citizens bring over all their massive extended families to share in all this wealth of Ireland too. No wonder they're jumping around in celebration!

That's nearly a hundred thousand now.

They are even coming here for the State pension now - we have seen them collect it!

What a shower of sell-out gobshites control the Dail parties in this country, best stay at home and don't vote and encourage them.

Foreigners here are now costing the Irish taxpayer four billions a year and they are why we can't balance a budget any more in this country but have to borrow to keep them and gamble our future.

It's the economy that's suffering from all this, foolishness , stupid!

WATERFORD LAND GRAB - Kilkenny fights back!

"KILKENNY COUNCIL MORE SUCCESSFUL THAN WATERFORD COUNCIL" - DAVID FITZGERALD.

"Waterford have made a mess of their own city!" - Fitzgerald.

MINISTERS TRY TO RAM THROUGH LAND GRAB WITHOUT A HEARING.

Without a hearing, without a "fair trial", Environment minister Alan Kelly along with his Waterford minister Paudey Coffey try to ram through a Waterford land grab of South Kilkenny, this after all the millions that Kilkenny County Council have poured into the development of the area, especially in recent years.

The elected members of Kilkenny County Council have said they are ‘of one voice’ in their determination to protect the interests of south Kilkenny and the wider county.

The councillors of the Piltown Municipal District convened a special meeting at short notice in the Ferrybank local area office last Wednesday morning to discuss the news that a boundary committee has been established to look at the Waterford/Kilkenny boundary.

“This has been sprung on us in the past week or so,” said chairman of the Piltown MD Pat Dunphy (FG) at that meeting.

“It’s a serious issue for this part of the county, and for the whole of the county really. We need to hear each others’ views and decide on a strategy.”

Then on Friday a special meeting of Kilkenny County Council took place. There was a palpable sense of anger in the council chamber with several councillors making impassioned speeches. At Wednesday's south Kilkenny meeting Cllr Eamon Aylward (FF) had said Ferrybank and south Kilkenny could be developed in a sustainable way without a change to the boundaries.

“We have constantly looked for meetings with Waterford,” he said.

“Just one Waterford councillor showed up when we finally got a meeting. That shows you what interest they have in Ferrybank.

“But this is coming from the Minister, and Paudie Coffey seems to be leading the charge,” he said.

“We all know where he’s from.”

A visibly angry councillor Ger Frisby (FF) said he ‘didn’t feel comfortable in his chair’, and said Coffey and Kelly should resign over this.

“I am shocked,” he said.

“I have lived in Slieverue all my life – it is my home, the culture, the heritage. Alan Kelly and Paudie Coffey don’t live in Slieverue. But with the swing of a pen they are trying to change people’s lives.

“I’m disgusted. I have nothing against Waterford – my father grew up there, I have friends there. But the people of Waterford aren’t looking for this either. It’s an absolute disgrace.”

The councillors are also worried that Kilkenny will end up losing Belview and the all-important port, where significant investment has been made by Kilkenny County Council in recent years.

Cllr Fidelis Doherty described herself as ‘shell-shocked’.

“I can’t believe that this is happening,” she said.

“It is so annoying that it has been put upon us. The implications of a takeover are massive – for the region, our culture and heritage.

“Kilkenny purchased land in Belview to make it happen. Waterford didn’t buy into that. Now that all the work has been done and the heavy lifting has happened...

“It is thousands of acres. If this change happens even the provinces will change. Those areas will go into Munster? It is a shocking development.”

Earlier in the week, she had said the establishment of the boundary committee amounted to an ‘attack’ on south Kilkenny.

“This is going to go on and on,” she said.

“How much of Kilkenny do they want? Is the monster going to raise its head again? Are we going to see another map in ten years time?”

Cllr Pat Dunphy (FG) said a lot of people going to be upset about what was happening.

“We haven’t caused it or looked for it,” he said.

“And we will fight for what is ours. I know that we are all as one here.”

He said that having to deal with the boundary committee over the coming months could seriously curtail the council’s other work.

“This is a worrying development. It is probably far more worrying than the previous time,” he said.

“There are far more important things they should be looking at – we have a housing crisis, and other crises – and they are talking about a boundary extension? The amount of money and resources [that will be needed] for this. I actually can’t believe it. It makes no sense whatsoever.”

Rather, said Cllr Dunphy, Kilkenny County Council should consider seeking a return to the original boundary along the middle of the river.

Cllr Eamon Aylward said he supported this call for a counter-proposal to make the river the boundary. He also said an oral hearing should be insisted upon.

Cllr Tomas Breathnach (LAB) called for a regional approach to the issue. He noted there was a reference to potential financial implications in the boundary committee’s terms of reference, but no reference to the sense of identity and community that people have.

Cllr David Fitzgerald (FG) said that the core objective of Kilkenny County Council was to promote the economic and social needs of Kilkenny. He said that if it had failed in this then Belview and the Ferrybank area would not have seen investment or development.

“But Kilkenny County Council has been hugely successful – more successful than Waterford City and County Council, who have made a mess of their city,” he said.

“We have been successful in south Kilkenny, Waterford City and County Council has not.” He added that, given the seriousness of the situation, it was essential to have an oral hearing. He said that if the boundary committee was to refuse one, Kilkenny County Council should seek a judicial review and have its day in court.

 

Friday, 10 July 2015 13:40

A BLOT ON OUR MEDIEVAL CITYSCAPE

UGLY SIGNAGE ON CITY CENTRE GABLE END.

This is a disgrace, a blot on our medieval cityscape. This is really ugly. The judge , when next he is sitting in the court next door, should issue a warrant for the arrest of the perpetrators of this outrage.

How on earth did anybody give planning permission for this monstrosity? Were there any councillors involved , and if so who? Surely councillors were notified anyway?

...

Talk about the CAS bridge, this is much worse and not a word about it. Some councillors , some people , know when to keep their mouths firmly clamped shut and this is one of those times.

This is public vandalism. This gable end must be restored and the sooner the better.

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HERE IS THE UGLY FACE OF AN ARCH TRAITOR TO IRELAND.

This fella, Peter Sutherland, a former Fine Gael attorney general, is intent on selling the people of Ireland out. He is a Bilderberger, a member of the self-appointed Trilateral Commission , allied groups of millionaires who want to rule the world.

He is the fella appointed by them to draw Ireland and the Irish into line and as such he now heads a Catholic world body that encourages and finances mass immigration out of Africa, Pakistan , South America and into Ireland and the West. His partner in crime here in Ireland is Simon Coveney, the Minister for Agriculture and Defence who recently attended his first Bilderbergers meeting. He is filmed doing so, it's up on YouTube . Coveney is being groomed as leader of Fine Gael and potential Taoiseach!

These boys are filthy rich and have become convinced of their own superiority over the mere Irish. So far , with the active aid of the EU, the UN and the Irish governments they have managed to direct the mass influx of a million immigrants into Ireland and they're not going to stop there.

You are living in a time of plantation. This is by far the biggest plantation of Ireland we are seeing since Elizabethan times, but this time it's the Irish who are planting their own country under false and mistaken concepts of human rights and equality that have pushed a half a million Irish people out of what was supposed to be their inheritance at birth, their birthright, a share in their own country.

The idea is that in fifty years time the Irish will be in a minority in their own country and Ireland populated by a coffee coloured people who won't be Irish, but a malleable mass of people with no national identities who will be a pushover to rule and to exploit.

Next week the coalition government will move to legalise five thousand illegals, the Press having painted a God-awful picture of Ireland's Gulag , Ireland's very own Auschwitz, - Butlins Holiday Camp. For the media have a huge role in selling this latter day plantation of Ireland as well. And with the present upsurge of young Pakistani males transiting Britain for Ireland this is designed to open up space in Butlins for the new arrivals and thus the diabolical plan will proceed.

There's absolutely no hope from Fianna Fail to stop it - they started it and have a Bill in the Dail to legalise 30,000 illegal aliens immediately here! And Gerry Adams thinks he's Ireland's Mandela - that's a fact - so Sinn Fein are up to their necks in it too. Many of the fools consider themselves everything from trendy lefties to cool liberals to equalitarian humanists - they're all sold fabulous pictures of themselves as world saviours as they sell their country out from beneath their feet in a mad rush to be considered amongst the liberal elite.

As a candidate, Peter O'Loughlin, who ran here in the recent by-election plaintively asked, "what is there left to celebrate 1916 next year?"

What it's all costing is colossal. The cost to Ireland in terms off welfare, health, education and housing is a minimum 4 Billions a year. All this has cost us 50 Billions since it started. It's the second biggest cost that Ireland has to pay after the bank bail-out loans. And this is self-inflicted as well. But unlike the bank collapse this is costing us more and more and mounting up every day. It will all help to sink us more and more into the morass.

Sutherland met the Pope this morning, we have just learned, and he has spoken his propaganda unchallenged for the past quarter of an hour on RTE radio.

The Kilkenny Journal's photo.

 

Thursday, 25 June 2015 11:48

THE PHELANS STAND UP FOR KILKENNY.

THE PHELANS STAND UP FOR KILKENNY!

Phelan is a great name in Kilkenny and now the elected representatives of that powerful clan here are leading the fight to save south county Kilkenny.

The Kilkenny People newspaper yesterday elaborated on a big Kilkenny Journal story and featured it on their front page.

Kilkenny People headlines yesterday - Minister for Rural Affairs Ann Phelan and John Paul Phelan TD are standing firm in response to a review on extending the Waterford Boundary into South Kilkenny.

The announcement was made in the context of plans to develop the North Quays(which are on the railway station side of the river at Waterford) and it is believed to be an effort by Paudey Coffey TD, Junior Minister at Environment, to garner personal support ahead of the next general election.

“Previous attempts were made to grab land from Kilkenny in 1980, 1992 2002 and 2005. Now 10 years on, a fresh attempt is being made to gain control of the Port of Waterford and a large chunk of valuable land and a population which is very much Kilkenny,” Minister Ann Phelan charged.

“This is and always has been a highly emotive and contentious issue for the people of South Kilkenny and unfortunately, it is most apparent that it is an issue that is not fully understood by the powers that be; if it were then this would not even be considered. To dismiss this issue as simply “just a review” is misguided in the extreme,” she said.

“Working with my colleague John Paul Phelan TD, we will be supporting the residents of South Kilkenny, standing by them, our local representatives and our local authorities, to ensure that things remain as they are. There is no legislative basis for this decision, and it does not form any commitment in the Fine Gael/Labour Programme for Government,” she pointed out.

“Kilkenny has a great working relationship with the Port of Waterford which is in County Kilkenny and part of Slieverue parish. The partnership approach between Kilkenny County Council and the Port is a very important one and should be further capitalised on. Approximately €25 million has been invested in the Port by its customers in the last year alone,” Ann continued.

Deputy John Paul Phelan was equally uncompromising in his comments in response to the announcement by the junior minister for Local Government Coffey who is from Co Waterford.

“The people of South Kilkenny stood firm in 1980 and in 1992. They expressed their disquiet in 2002 and 2005. Ten years on the status quo remains.

“I, along with Minister Ann Phelan, will be standing shoulder to shoulder with my constituents and my neighbours in Ferrybank, Co Kilkenny, on this matter.

“For the region to benefit from the emerging prosperity it requires cohesive action by councillors and all elected reps. It does not require another costly report gathering dust.

“Kilkenny and Waterford Councils have officials that have the skills necessary to develop a straight forward cohesive plan that will allow Waterford City and it’s hinterland to prosper . Rather than writing a report on redrawing lines on map, why not write a plan and implement it to transform the area?” Deputy Phelan asked.

“As somebody who lives in the area, I have a personal interest in it and would like to see that the area develop more. As the local TD I would to be happy to help and make it work.

“The Ferrybank shopping centre would have been built and operational prior to the to the downturn if there had been no constant objections by neighbouring local Authorities. After years of attempts there was recently a meeting between the Piltown and Waterford City/ Tramore Councillors on issues of co-operation. All six Kilkenny councillors showed up, only one Waterford councillor turned up. The substantive issue is where we step in. Do we move the boundary and if we do what will happen in 10/15 years, what will happen? Will there be another boundary move?” Deputy Phelan asked.

“Recent substantial investment in the Waterford environs include the establishment of a new Council Office and Library for south Kilkenny in the Ferrybank Shopping Centre. Also the new sewage system and the treatment plant was an example of how a strong partnership approach and co-operation can work,” he said.

Now ten years on a fresh attempt is being made to gain control of the Port of Waterford at Belview and a large chunk of valuable land and a population which is very much Kilkenny.

The two Phelans will fight this land grab to the end. And as another TD Bobby Aylward pointed out there is a conflict of interest concerning the Waterford TD Paudey Coffey. Coffey is junior minister in the Local Government department that is in charge of area transfers between counties nationally and is a Waterford TD at the same time. |

That is not on. Coffey must remove himself from the Environment department if he is to take any further part in forwarding the Waterford cause at the expense of Kilkenny. That's what everybody does in the case of a conflict of interest and that is plainly Coffey's direction now.

The Kilkenny Journal's photo.
The Kilkenny Journal's photo.
121 people reached

 

Tuesday, 23 June 2015 14:20

THE TOWN FARCE

THE TOWN FARCE.

Kilkenny "City "Council" a Mickey Mouse job.
-so-called council doesn't even have a bank account!

...

What your local councillor won't tell you.

After Hogan abolished Kilkenny Borough Council last year a sub-committee of the County Council took over the city. Basically in Northern Ireland terms Kilkenny city is under direct rule from County Hall in John Street.

And this sub-committee is named "Kilkenny Municipal Council" in an attempt to fool us all further. This Mickey Mouse city council has no powers except to create freemen and the like and to host social occasions in the town hall. And to dress up.

It has no powers to advance the city. If it had then the new bridge could have been stopped by it, for instance.

It's a dress up council for county councillors from county hall to come over and dress up in the former Kilkenny Corporation robes of office and to elect a chairman from their midst who is then dubbed mayor. This so-called "city council" does not even have a bank account!

And as anybody in the local media will tell you, you will never find another body of men and women anywhere so brilliant at praising one another and bluffing that they're so important and mouthing garbage as they do so. That's what it is degenerated to now.

Meanwhile the latest fella to be elected Mayor of Kilkenny by that useless body last night, Wexfordman Joe Malone, is off over to Kilkenny Military Barracks this afternoon to celebrate his mayoralty with a guard of honour and the celebration of the Most Holy Sacrifice of the Mass .

And most appropriately for a man who declared two years ago that he wants a soup kitchen instead of the five-million medieval mile project paving High Street and the city centre , the Army is laying on soup and sandwiches for the occasion of their celebration of the new mayor who was a private soldier of theirs for thirty years...

The rest of the stooges from the town hall should be in attendance, all dressed up.

We look forward to Mayor G.I. Joe's soup kitchen whenever it gets it up and running!
Keep a bowl for us, Joe:-)

Monday, 22 June 2015 12:11

EXIT OF A MASTER.

OLIVER DUNPHY, A GREAT PHOTOGRAPHER.
Exit of a Master.

by Michael McGrath.

...

Oliver photographed Kilkenny as nobody ever has. Back in the 70's he put on a fabulous exhibition in the Metropole Hotel. There he showed photographs of this city from angles that set it off well in murals as big as your front door.

Kilkenny Tourism borrowed all those exhibits to publicise the city around the USA afterwards. Those photos were lovingly created on his first Hassleblad 500CM. The problem was that they bored four large holes in the corners of each mural to screw them up on exhibition centre walls and Oliver was saddened by this. It destroyed them, as he told me, and they each cost a small fortune to make.

He had plans , he told me, to likewise photograph the historic jewels of County Kilkenny, but ill health intervened to prevent him.

Oliver Dunphy was, to my mind, the very best urban landscape photographer of his time here in Ireland.. He loved using medium format film in his Hasselblads and never used digital. He also used Nikon for 35mm photography , mostly for colour slides. But he was magnificent as a professional no matter what the tools. He was meticulous, a perfectionist at everything he touched, and a lovely man to talk shop with. He would talk to you for hours about photography below in High Street in his studio, stopping only to sell something to a customer. We whiled away many an interesting hour. And what he told you about photography could be found in no book.

I went to work for Oliver as a young photographer back in February 1966 and we always remained friends ever since. I was mainly attending events such as weddings on his behalf along with another Kilkenny professional photographer, the late Donal Barry, who ran a studio in Friary Street. We were all of a group of photographer friends together that time - , the Flynn Brothers (Gerry and Jimmy) , Donal Barry, Oliver, all deceased now, only Tom Brett and myself left from back in the day, and that's why I speak of Oliver now. That was an era when Kilkenny could put it up to Dublin, or anywhere, for the quality of our photography. He and I remained great friends and I missed dropping into him in the studio after he retired from his High Street studio some years ago.

He was a lovely man, a gentleman, always dapper as a visiting American photographer noted one day. He was so easy to get on with, he never uttered a note of criticism of anybody in his life but was nice and quiet, lovely and professional.

If ever a photographer could capture heaven, it's Oliver.

(Deepest sympathy to his daughter Maria, rev. sister Nina and family)

Yet another massive claim to fame for Kilkenny.

JAMES JOYCE LIVED AS A JOURNALIST IN KILKENNY.
Bloomsday to be celebrated in Kilkenny on Tuesday week

- Joycean Society President Gabriel Murray.
"Joyce lived in Langton House and drank in the Marble City Bar!"

Kilkenny filmmaker and historian Gabriel Murray has made the astonishing claim that James Joyce lived in Kilkenny! This would have been at the turn of the Twentieth century when his sister "Poppie" was a novice in the Convent of Mercy in Callan.

According to Mr. Murray, who is President of the newly-formed Kilkenny Joycean Society, Joyce worked here as a reporter for The Farmers Journal and lived just over the Butter Slip in a room at High Street, that was formerly Maria's Café and now is a gentleman's outfitters, and which was originally the ancient Langton's House alongside the famous city slipway. Gabriel wants a plaque to Joyce in memory of his Kilkenny sojourn placed beside the ancient doorway in the laneway that Joyce would have used to come and go.

Bloomsday on Tuesday week 16th June will therefore be celebrated in Kilkenny this year for the first time ever with a talk by Mr. Murray on Joyce's time in Kilkenny, titled, "The Lost City of James Joyce", as Gabriel makes the fabulous claim that Kilkenny is the third Joycean city in the world after Dublin and Paris.

Did Joyce drink in the Marble City Bar, was he a regular in The Hole in the Wall? Indeed Joyce mentions the "Kilkenny People" newspaper in Ulysses, so he was probably an avid reader of our famed local newspaper. Did he attend the theatre in Kilkenny? Did he stroll along the canal as he wrought his literary art? Gabriel intends to reveal all on Tuesday week next , 16th June, in an event titled , "James Joyce's Kilkenny", and all will be welcome. The Marble City Bar would have been Joyce's local as a young man in Kilkenny.

He wants interested people to dress up in Bloomsday style with straw hats and flowers in their lapels, striped blazers and red and yellow trousers , in dress suits , dickie bows , whatever you can get your hands on. He plans to centre the events around Langtons of John Street, remarking that Joyce stayed in Langton House at the Butter Slip and probably drank in Eamon Langton's other city pub, the Marble City Bar. He plans a Joycean high tea there.

Gabriel Murray and his society are planning a series of Joycean events including a play about Joyce, as they explore 'the lost city of James Joyce', none other than our own sweet city by the Nore, Kilkenny.

Gabriel wants suitable members to emerge for his new Joycean Society to explore the fabulous world of Kilkenny when Joyce lived here, so everybody genuinely interested in Joyce and his links with Kilkenny are all welcome.

This is huge prestige for Kilkenny as a centre of the highest culture anywhere. So we therefore wish Gabriel and his indefatigable research every success in proving Kilkenny to be the third city in the world that James Joyce lived and worked in. His valuable research findings could help Kilkenny become the European City of Culture. In any event he deserves to be supported in this his latest literary endeavour far and wide.

The Kilkenny Journal's photo.

 

Yet another massive claim to fame for Kilkenny.

JAMES JOYCE LIVED AS A JOURNALIST IN KILKENNY.
Bloomsday to be celebrated in Kilkenny on Tuesday week

- Joycean Society President Gabriel Murray.
"Joyce lived in Langton House and drank in the Marble City Bar!"

Kilkenny filmmaker and historian Gabriel Murray has made the astonishing claim that James Joyce lived in Kilkenny! This would have been at the turn of the Twentieth century when his sister "Poppie" was a novice in the Convent of Mercy in Callan.

According to Mr. Murray, who is President of the newly-formed Kilkenny Joycean Society, Joyce worked here as a reporter for The Farmers Journal and lived just over the Butter Slip in a room at High Street, that was formerly Maria's Café and now is a gentleman's outfitters, and which was originally the ancient Langton's House alongside the famous city slipway. Gabriel wants a plaque to Joyce in memory of his Kilkenny sojourn placed beside the ancient doorway in the laneway that Joyce would have used to come and go.

Bloomsday on Tuesday week 16th June will therefore be celebrated in Kilkenny this year for the first time ever with a talk by Mr. Murray on Joyce's time in Kilkenny, titled, "The Lost City of James Joyce", as Gabriel makes the fabulous claim that Kilkenny is the third Joycean city in the world after Dublin and Paris.

Did Joyce drink in the Marble City Bar, was he a regular in The Hole in the Wall? Indeed Joyce mentions the "Kilkenny People" newspaper in Ulysses, so he was probably an avid reader of our famed local newspaper. Did he attend the theatre in Kilkenny? Did he stroll along the canal as he wrought his literary art? Gabriel intends to reveal all on Tuesday week next , 16th June, in an event titled , "James Joyce's Kilkenny", and all will be welcome. The Marble City Bar would have been Joyce's local as a young man in Kilkenny.

He wants interested people to dress up in Bloomsday style with straw hats and flowers in their lapels, striped blazers and red and yellow trousers , in dress suits , dickie bows , whatever you can get your hands on. He plans to centre the events around Langtons of John Street, remarking that Joyce stayed in Langton House at the Butter Slip and probably drank in Eamon Langton's other city pub, the Marble City Bar. He plans a Joycean high tea there.

Gabriel Murray and his society are planning a series of Joycean events including a play about Joyce, as they explore 'the lost city of James Joyce', none other than our own sweet city by the Nore, Kilkenny.

Gabriel wants suitable members to emerge for his new Joycean Society to explore the fabulous world of Kilkenny when Joyce lived here, so everybody genuinely interested in Joyce and his links with Kilkenny are all welcome.

This is huge prestige for Kilkenny as a centre of the highest culture anywhere. So we therefore wish Gabriel and his indefatigable research every success in proving Kilkenny to be the third city in the world that James Joyce lived and worked in. His valuable research findings could help Kilkenny become the European City of Culture. In any event he deserves to be supported in this his latest literary endeavour far and wide.

The Kilkenny Journal's photo.

 

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